Visiting Artists Program: Theaster Gates: William and Stephanie Sick Distinguished Professor

Tuesday, September 2, 6:00 p.m.Rubloff Auditorium, 230 S. Columbus Dr.


Theaster Gates is an artist and innovator who combines strategies of urban planning, object making, and performance. Gates is internationally recognized for his work on the South Side of Chicago, including Dorchester Projects, Black Cinema House, and the upcoming Stony Island Arts Bank and Dorchester Artist Housing Collaborative. Founder of the non-profit Rebuild Foundation, Gates produces work both in museums and in communities that responds creatively to the challenges of space.
Gates has exhibited and performed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Punta della Dogana, Venice; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; and Documenta 13, Kassel, Germany, among others. Gates has received awards and grants from the Knight Foundation, Skowhegan, Creative Time, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, United States Artists, Creative Capital, the Joyce Foundation, Graham Foundation, and Artadia.

Visiting Artists Program: Theaster Gates: William and Stephanie Sick Distinguished Professor

Tuesday, September 2, 6:00 p.m.
Rubloff Auditorium, 230 S. Columbus Dr.

Theaster Gates is an artist and innovator who combines strategies of urban planning, object making, and performance. Gates is internationally recognized for his work on the South Side of Chicago, including Dorchester Projects, Black Cinema House, and the upcoming Stony Island Arts Bank and Dorchester Artist Housing Collaborative. Founder of the non-profit Rebuild Foundation, Gates produces work both in museums and in communities that responds creatively to the challenges of space.

Gates has exhibited and performed at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Punta della Dogana, Venice; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; and Documenta 13, Kassel, Germany, among others. Gates has received awards and grants from the Knight Foundation, Skowhegan, Creative Time, the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, United States Artists, Creative Capital, the Joyce Foundation, Graham Foundation, and Artadia.

Student work by Sophie Loloi on SAIC Portfolios

Alumni work by McKenzie Thompson (MFA 2014)

Alumni work by Cole Don Kelley (BFA 2012)

Welcome to SAIC the Class of 2018!

Welcome to SAIC the Class of 2018!

Alumni work by Jason Guo (BFA 2014)

Welcome new and returning students! Ready to make some art?

Welcome new and returning students! Ready to make some art?

Conversations on Art and Science:Anna Von Mertens
Thursday, August 28, 12:00 p.mThe LeRoy Neiman Center, 37 S. Wabash Ave.
Anna Von Mertens translates data from odd avenues of knowledge on to textiles with stitching to define time intervals around low points in American history, such as the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination, and the bombing of Baghdad. Her translations are mapped out with the aid of a computer program and then hand-stitched to become celestial time-lapsed tapestries that are sized in wide-screen dimensions. Each piece accurately reproduces the rotation of the stars and planets as they would have been viewed from earth at the location and time of a particular event. Von Mertens received a United States Artists Simon Fellowship in 2010 and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Biennial Award in 2007.

Conversations on Art and Science:
Anna Von Mertens

Thursday, August 28, 12:00 p.m
The LeRoy Neiman Center, 37 S. Wabash Ave.


Anna Von Mertens translates data from odd avenues of knowledge on to textiles with stitching to define time intervals around low points in American history, such as the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination, and the bombing of Baghdad. Her translations are mapped out with the aid of a computer program and then hand-stitched to become celestial time-lapsed tapestries that are sized in wide-screen dimensions. Each piece accurately reproduces the rotation of the stars and planets as they would have been viewed from earth at the location and time of a particular event. Von Mertens received a United States Artists Simon Fellowship in 2010 and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Biennial Award in 2007.

Aging in the Afterlife, The Many Deaths of Art
When: Monday, August 25 2014, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
 Location: 1st Floor Neiman Center 
The “death of art” has been a recurring theme within aesthetic and philosophical discourse for over two centuries. At times, this “death” has been proclaimed as an accomplished fact; at others, artists themselves have taken the “death of art” as a goal to be accomplished. So while this widely perceived “death” is lamented by many as a loss, it is celebrated by others as a moment of life renewed. For them, art is all the better for having disburdened itself of the baggage of outmoded modernist ideologies. Insofar as the “death” of longstanding cultural traditions has in the past typically been understood to signal a deeper crisis in society at large, however, the meaning of death necessarily takes on a different aspect today — especially when the tradition in question is modernism, the so-called the “tradition of the new” (Rosenberg). Because the notions of “death” and “crisis” appear to belong to the very edifice of modernity that has just been rejected, these too are are to be jettisoned as part of its conventional yoke. Modernity itself having become passé, even the notion of art’s “death” would seem to have died along with modernism.
We thus ask our panelists not merely whether art is at present “dead,” but also if traditions are even permitted the right to perish in conservative times. If some once held that the persistence of philosophy indicated the persistence of obsolete social conditions, does the persistence of art signal ongoing social conditions that ought to have long ago withered away? If so, what forms of political and artistic practice would be sufficient to realize art, and in what ways would realizing art signal something beyond art? Marx felt that the increasing worldliness of philosophy in his time (heralded by the culmination of philosophy in Hegel) demanded not only the end of philosophy, but also that the world itself become philosophical. If avant-garde movements once declared uncompromising war on art in order to tear down the barrier between art and life, would the end or overcoming of art not similarly require that the world itself become artistic?
For more information about this student group and events, visit here.

Aging in the Afterlife, The Many Deaths of Art

When: Monday, August 25 2014, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location: 1st Floor Neiman Center

The “death of art” has been a recurring theme within aesthetic and philosophical discourse for over two centuries. At times, this “death” has been proclaimed as an accomplished fact; at others, artists themselves have taken the “death of art” as a goal to be accomplished. So while this widely perceived “death” is lamented by many as a loss, it is celebrated by others as a moment of life renewed. For them, art is all the better for having disburdened itself of the baggage of outmoded modernist ideologies. Insofar as the “death” of longstanding cultural traditions has in the past typically been understood to signal a deeper crisis in society at large, however, the meaning of death necessarily takes on a different aspect today — especially when the tradition in question is modernism, the so-called the “tradition of the new” (Rosenberg). Because the notions of “death” and “crisis” appear to belong to the very edifice of modernity that has just been rejected, these too are are to be jettisoned as part of its conventional yoke. Modernity itself having become passé, even the notion of art’s “death” would seem to have died along with modernism.

We thus ask our panelists not merely whether art is at present “dead,” but also if traditions are even permitted the right to perish in conservative times. If some once held that the persistence of philosophy indicated the persistence of obsolete social conditions, does the persistence of art signal ongoing social conditions that ought to have long ago withered away? If so, what forms of political and artistic practice would be sufficient to realize art, and in what ways would realizing art signal something beyond art? Marx felt that the increasing worldliness of philosophy in his time (heralded by the culmination of philosophy in Hegel) demanded not only the end of philosophy, but also that the world itself become philosophical. If avant-garde movements once declared uncompromising war on art in order to tear down the barrier between art and life, would the end or overcoming of art not similarly require that the world itself become artistic?

For more information about this student group and events, visit here.

WEST 

August 25–September 25Reception: September 8, 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Gallery X, 280 S. Columbus Dr., room 113


WEST, featuring Elena Ailes (MFA 2015), Lucas Briffa (MFA 2015), Matt Coleman (MA 2015), and Alison Reilly (MA 2015), deconstructs romantic stereotypes about the American West while questioning the ways in which humans mythologize the land. This interdepartmental collective will explore the conflation of personal memory, dislocation and myth, and investigate the power of ideology, secrecy, and mediation within the West’s perceived emptiness. Together, these artists will present artwork alongside research, produce a publication, and host public forums.
Research for the exhibition is supported by an EAGER Grant from the Earl and Brenda Shapiro Center for Research and Collaboration at SAIC.

WEST 

August 25–September 25
Reception: September 8, 4:00–6:00 p.m.

Gallery X, 280 S. Columbus Dr., room 113

WEST, featuring Elena Ailes (MFA 2015), Lucas Briffa (MFA 2015), Matt Coleman (MA 2015), and Alison Reilly (MA 2015), deconstructs romantic stereotypes about the American West while questioning the ways in which humans mythologize the land. This interdepartmental collective will explore the conflation of personal memory, dislocation and myth, and investigate the power of ideology, secrecy, and mediation within the West’s perceived emptiness. Together, these artists will present artwork alongside research, produce a publication, and host public forums.

Research for the exhibition is supported by an EAGER Grant from the Earl and Brenda Shapiro Center for Research and Collaboration at SAIC.

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
4exposures1sheetoffilm-Self-2014
8x10 gelatin silver contact print
Marco Lorenzetti
mlorenzetti.net

Alumni work by Marco Lorenzetti (MFA 1991)

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:

4exposures1sheetoffilm-Self-2014

8x10 gelatin silver contact print

Marco Lorenzetti

mlorenzetti.net

Alumni work by Marco Lorenzetti (MFA 1991)

New Students!
Are you excited for tomorrow?! Take a look at the orientation schedule and all the fun plans for this weekend here!

New Students!

Are you excited for tomorrow?! Take a look at the orientation schedule and all the fun plans for this weekend here!

Surface Tension

August 19–October 4Reception: Thursday, September 19Sullivan Galleries, 33 S. State St., 7th floor


Surface Tension showcases projects by current MFA and BFA students as selected through portfolio reviews by the SAIC Exhibitions and Exhibition Studies Committee. This year’s exhibition is rooted in exploratory and critical modes of making and viewing. Featuring work by Selva Aparicio, Bachar Bachara, Simon Belleau, Naama Hadany, Kevin Lee, Kelly Lloyd, Leah Mackin, Gulsah Mursaloglu, Jacob Raeder, Yong Chu Son, Daniel Spangler, and Leonard Suryajaya. Curated by Graduate Curatorial Assistants Cassie Carpenter (Dual MA 2015) and Elisabeth Smith (Dual MA 2015), with Curatorial Assistant Taylor Hughes (BA 2016).

Surface Tension

August 19–October 4
Reception: Thursday, September 19
Sullivan Galleries, 33 S. State St., 7th floor

Surface Tension showcases projects by current MFA and BFA students as selected through portfolio reviews by the SAIC Exhibitions and Exhibition Studies Committee. This year’s exhibition is rooted in exploratory and critical modes of making and viewing. Featuring work by Selva Aparicio, Bachar Bachara, Simon Belleau, Naama Hadany, Kevin Lee, Kelly Lloyd, Leah Mackin, Gulsah Mursaloglu, Jacob Raeder, Yong Chu Son, Daniel Spangler, and Leonard Suryajaya. Curated by Graduate Curatorial Assistants Cassie Carpenter (Dual MA 2015) and Elisabeth Smith (Dual MA 2015), with Curatorial Assistant Taylor Hughes (BA 2016).

Alumni work by Janna van Hasselt (MFA 2014)

New Students! 

Have you had the opportunity to look at the Orientation Leaders, read their Welcome Letters (like these above) or peak at the orientation schedule?

Check it out here!