vicemag:

Why and How to Leave Facebook
Nick Briz is a Chicago-based new media artist, educator, and organizer. Briz teaches at the Marwen Foundation and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, has shown his work internationally, and is the co-founder of the GLI.TC/H conference. While all of that is undeniably impressive, I must say I knew Briz was a genius when I first saw, “Apple Computers,” a powerful affront against Apple and a manifesto for the prosumer of our age. So, when Briz made “How To / Why Leave Facebook,” a piece about leaving Facebook, I knew I should pay attention. 
 
I recently left Facebook as well, but I was uninterested in any self-congratulatory artwork or dramatic fuck-you to the social platform. I hadn’t enjoyed my time on Facebook for a while, but Facebook had been such a large part of my life for 9 years. I don’t buy most complaints about it “not being real life,” or some useless addiction. As the largest social network in the world, Facebook is very much a part of real life, I just hadn’t felt like I was benefitting from that part of my life.   
 
My vague discontentedness with Facebook finally reached a boiling point in light of theiremotional contagion study. The highly controversial academic study was recently published, and it claims that Facebook had secretly manipulated the emotional state of nearly 700,000 of its users. I understood that Facebook’s main purpose is to make advertising dollars from it’s users, but this felt excessively creepy. And as VICE News has already reported, one of the study’s researches received funding from the Minerva initiative—helping the Pentagon study and quell social unrest—that made it all the more creepy. Yet I knew Briz would offer some insight beyond the most recent headlines. 
Continue

Interview with faculty and alumni Nick Briz (MFA 2011)

vicemag:

Why and How to Leave Facebook

Nick Briz is a Chicago-based new media artist, educator, and organizer. Briz teaches at the Marwen Foundation and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, has shown his work internationally, and is the co-founder of the GLI.TC/H conference. While all of that is undeniably impressive, I must say I knew Briz was a genius when I first saw, “Apple Computers,” a powerful affront against Apple and a manifesto for the prosumer of our age. So, when Briz made “How To / Why Leave Facebook,” a piece about leaving Facebook, I knew I should pay attention. 
 
I recently left Facebook as well, but I was uninterested in any self-congratulatory artwork or dramatic fuck-you to the social platform. I hadn’t enjoyed my time on Facebook for a while, but Facebook had been such a large part of my life for 9 years. I don’t buy most complaints about it “not being real life,” or some useless addiction. As the largest social network in the world, Facebook is very much a part of real life, I just hadn’t felt like I was benefitting from that part of my life.   
 
My vague discontentedness with Facebook finally reached a boiling point in light of theiremotional contagion study. The highly controversial academic study was recently published, and it claims that Facebook had secretly manipulated the emotional state of nearly 700,000 of its users. I understood that Facebook’s main purpose is to make advertising dollars from it’s users, but this felt excessively creepy. And as VICE News has already reported, one of the study’s researches received funding from the Minerva initiative—helping the Pentagon study and quell social unrest—that made it all the more creepy. Yet I knew Briz would offer some insight beyond the most recent headlines. 

Continue

Interview with faculty and alumni Nick Briz (MFA 2011)

Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts: Visiting Artist Program
Joseph Grigely

Thursday, July 24, 6:00 p.m.Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.


Joseph Grigely’s work involves the performative act of conversational exchange. His work is in collections that include the Tate Modern, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and he is Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at SAIC.

Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts: Visiting Artist Program

Joseph Grigely

Thursday, July 24, 6:00 p.m.
Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.

Joseph Grigely’s work involves the performative act of conversational exchange. His work is in collections that include the Tate Modern, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and he is Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at SAIC.

Join us for SAIC’s Low-Residency MFA Open Studio Night

You are invited to our campus on Friday, July 25 at 6:30PM for our Low Residency Open Studio Night. Please join our first Low Res class as they complete their first six week intensive and view the culmination of their endeavors.

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
LeRoy Neiman Center
37 S. Wabash Avenue

Alumni work by Jedediah Johnson (MFA 2013)

New Student Parent Webinar, Tuesday, July 29th 6:30-7:30pm central time

New Fall 2014 students! Coming up on Tuesday, July 29th from 6:30-7:30pm central time… New Student Parent Webinar! Tell your parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents, guardians, whoever is helping you with college, to tune in! They can sign up online at www.saic.edu/parents. There will be tons of info about finalizing your enrollment and things to think about for the start of school.

marie-laffont:

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

June 27–Oct 19, 2014

Jeff Koons was born in 1955 in York, Pennsylvania. He received his B.F.A. at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Since his emergence in the 1980s Jeff Koons has blended the concerns and methods of Pop, Conceptual, and appropriation art with craft-making and popular culture to create his own unique iconography, often controversial and always engaging. His work explores contemporary obsessions with sex and desire; race and gender; and celebrity, media, commerce, and fame. A self-proclaimed “idea man,” Koons hires artisans and technicians to make the actual works. For him, the hand of the artist is not the important issue: “Art is really just communication of something and the more archetypal it is, the more communicative it is.”

Jeff Koons’ artworks rarely inspire moderate responses, and this is one signal of the importance of his achievement. Focusing on some of the most unexpected objects as models for his work, Koons’ works eschew typical standards of “good taste” in art and zero in rather precisely on the vulnerabilities of hierarchies and value systems. As critic Christopher Knight has written “He turns the traditional cliché of the work of art inside out: Rather than embodying a spiritual or expressive essence of a highly individuated artist, art here is composed from a distinctly American set of conventional middle-class values.”

Since his first solo show in 1980, Koons’ work has been widely exhibited internationally in solo and group exhibitions. Recent solo shows include the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli (2003), the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo (2004), which traveled to the Helsinki City Art Museum (2005); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2008); “Jeff Koons: Versailles,” château de Versailles, France (2008–09). In 2009 alone, Koons had four major solo exhibitions in public institutions: the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; and the Serpentine Gallery, London. Most recently, the Beyeler Foundation hosted Koons’s first solo exhibition in a Swiss museum. Exhibitions also opened last June in Frankfurt where Koons’s paintings were presented at Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt while his sculptures were shown with works from the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung permanent collection.  The Whitney plans a major retrospective of his work in 2014. Koons lives and works in New York City.
 

Alumni work by Jeff Koons

Alumni work by Hsi Chen (MFA 2013) on SAIC Portfolios

Student work by Leyla Kiran

ATTENTION NEW FALL 2014 STUDENTS

Still have questions about the next steps to finalizing your fall enrollment? Go to www.saic.edu/ugnext to find everything that needs to be done by fall!

Alumni work by Beomyoung Sohn (MFA 2012)on SAIC Portfolios

Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts: Visiting Artist Program
Glenn Ligon

Friday, July 18, 6:00 p.m.Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.


Throughout his career, Glenn Ligon has explored American history, literature, and society in work that builds critically on the legacies of modern painting and more recent conceptual art. His first mid-career retrospective was at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2011.

Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts: Visiting Artist Program

Glenn Ligon

Friday, July 18, 6:00 p.m.
Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.

Throughout his career, Glenn Ligon has explored American history, literature, and society in work that builds critically on the legacies of modern painting and more recent conceptual art. His first mid-career retrospective was at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2011.

3 month building demo time lapse

3 month time lapse video of a building demolition in Chicago done by one of our alum, Justin Smith. Very nice!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4MITXcEIR4

Student work by Valerie Lopez on SAIC Portfolios

Alumni work by Richard Blackwell (MFA Printmedia 2014) on SAIC Portfolios

Student work by Matthew Ryan on SAIC Portfolios